© 2018 Transition Cobham

Aspirations - 2020

 

Our vision is to help create a healthier, happier and more sustainable Cobham.

 

At our open meeting on the 21st of May 2015, we once again brainstormed a vision for Cobham in 2020. We created a World Café by setting up four tables with topics such as Community, Energy/Waste, Food and Transport. The participants visited each table and shared their vision of Cobham in 2020. This provided us with inspiration which we carried into our projects.

Community
  • Cobham’s Art House cinema shows classic movies.

  • Young people learn skills from older people (e.g. gardening buddy).

  • Cobham looks after its most vulnerable residents (young, old, less able).

  • There is a buddy system where young people live with older people to help each other and provide companionship.

  • There are lots of community events for young people, teens and couples (e.g. dinner and dancing).

  • There are more social clubs in the centre of Cobham.

  • There are no more isolated people in Cobham and people no longer feel lonely.

  • Apple Day is a huge event attended by many residents to celebrate the harvest season and to press apples into juice.

  • We have a litter awareness campaign called “Cobham Clean Campaign” targeted at schools and adults.

  • If a shop in Cobham has been empty for 3 months, it can be used as a community pop-up shop e.g. swap shop.

  • Cobham passes ordinance that fences are no higher than 4 feet tall.

  • We have an even stronger Residents Association that brings all the groups involved in community issues together.

  • We have a local currency and high street traders accept the Cobham Pound.

  • We have a Local Exchange Trading System in Cobham, which allows people to “bank” hours spent helping others.

  • There is a football pitch or similar in Northfield area.

  • All Transition Cobham material has a section to publicise local relevant websites e.g. energy saving, group meetings, Freecycle, Streetlife, Streetbank

  • Churches help everyone to set up help groups if necessary.

  • There is more community involvement in Cobham.

  • The high street has many independent retailers (only 3 retailers of each type are allowed).

Food
  • Free local fun cookery lessons for children are available.

  • Transition Cobham runs a Love Food Hate Waste workshop.

  • Cobham residents know what fruit and vegetable seedlings look like (e.g. school education).

  • Cobham has a food forest based on permaculture principles.

  • There is some guerrilla gardening in the community, ensuring that plants are growing everywhere.

  • Cobham has herbs, edible flowers and fruit trees growing in the high street.

  • Wormeries and water butts are everywhere in Cobham.

  • Cobham restaurants have more specials and deals in order to reduce waste.

  • Cobham produces more local honey and beehives.

  • We have an annual food festival/street party.

  • Everyone grows some food (in pots, allotments or gardens).

  • Residents take over the running of the farmers’ market to make it more appealing (like they have in Ripley).

  • We have a café that cooks with out-of-date food. They sell meals at a discount.

  • There is food growing near Cobham Community Centre and the Day Centre.

  • The Food Bank is no longer needed because all residents are supported.

  • The best vegetarian café in the UK is in Cobham. It’s affordable and sells healthy foods

  • There are no Buy One Get One Free offers in Cobham, reducing waste.

  • The whole Cobham community supports the community garden.

  • Cobham has planted pollution-decreasing plants.

  • Cedar House is revived as a restaurant.

  • Herbs such as aniseed are planted on common grounds.

  • There is more vegetation around the library.

  • Cobham as a community has reduced its food waste.

  • Walking tours are organised focusing on plant identification of local vegetation.

  • Cooking classes for young people are available.

  • All residents know how to use nettles to create fertilizer, tea and soup.

  • Allotment holders in difficulty are helped through gardening help and sharing produce.

Energy/Waste
  • Community building and houses in Cobham have solar panels (which generate electricity) and solar thermal panels (which generate hot water).

  • Transition Cobham hosts a bi-monthly repair café so that people can have items repaired.

  • All Cobham residents are part of Transition Streets (learning how to use less energy and waste less)

  • We have a zero waste shop where you can buy foodstuffs in bulk and without packaging.

  • Water metering is prevalent in Cobham.

  • All new properties have water harvesters.

  • Cobham has managed to reduce its waste AND recycling (i.e. buying things with less packaging).

  • Local produce is available and bought in Cobham.

  • Several Passiv houses are built (very energy efficient homes).

  • There’s a water fountain in Cobham, possibly by the public loo, so that people don’t need to buy bottled water.

  • Heating and lighting out of hours is restricted in shops, offices, schools and public buildings.

  • Cobham generates hydroelectric power from the River Mole.

  • Cobham residents use Freecycling regularly.

  • Energy is generated from human activity in community buildings (i.e. walking over the floor generates energy).

  • Cobham residents have a more responsible attitude towards personal litter (e.g. beer cans, cigarette butts, “takeaway” waste, chewing gum).

  • There are more bins on high street and the bins have larger holes for larger items. There are fun bins, which make it more fun for children (and adults!) to not litter.

  • Pollution has dramatically reduced in the village; there’s less use of cars, safer cycling, and cleaner fuel sources (less diesel, then petrol and ultimately, electric).

  • Cobham monitors pollution levels using a portable unit in the high street.

  • All grocery stores in Cobham enclose frozen/refrigerated sections, wasting less energy.

  • Burning/open fires of garden waste and builders’ waste is prohibited in Cobham.

  • Cobham compost its waste locally and extracts energy from it (anaerobic digestion).

  • Cobham residents do not use plastic bags and always bring their own reusable bags.

Transport
  • There is a speed limit of 20mph in the high street and on residential roads.

  • Cobham has excellent footpaths.

  • There are speed bumps on cut-through roads.

  • Chatterbus route takes in Fairmile Lane, residential roads and council estates. Alternative routes run every hour.

  • There are less large school buses that are empty so that traffic flow is improved.

  • Church Street is pedestrianised.

  • There is a shared taxi service from Fairmile area to the village centre.

  • Cobham residents car-share.

  • There is more cycling and safer cycling.

  • Monthly walks are organised and well attended.

  • 2-hour or less parking on residential roads in the centre of Cobham is introduced.

  • Cars are only allowed to park on one side of the high street (the Sainsbury’s side as most of the loading takes place there).

  • Cobham has excellent bicycle lanes.

  • Cobham has a Boris bike system.

  • There is more parking for bikes in the centre of Cobham.

  • Residents are looking at the possibility of a one-way system in Copse Road/Anyards Road.

  • Residents drive smaller cars.

  • Cobham streets are pothole-free.

  • There is premium/free parking for electric cars in Cobham.

  • There is subsidised parking for shop workers in Downside Bridge Road car park in order to decongest residential roads.